Chapter 8

I longed once that an Empress take the throne,
all such hopes passed that a dragon had come,
that one born woman is greatest err yet to rise,
is but small consolation that woman in her died,
we needed not another to raise these stakes,
to change the game be it now forever too late?

– writings of Sylvia Grey, circa 140 E.R.

Weary Shadows

Estae 2nd, 640 E.R.

Laurel paced the King’s antechamber behind the throne room.  “I do not like this,” he admitted.

“We are loathed to admit We agree,” the King said heavily.  “That no further violence has plagued the east road seems ill comfort, as only our men travel there now to be so plagued.  If as we suspect Osyrae was behind that caravan’s complete destruction, then they achieved what they wished with a single attack.  We’ve received confirmation that no caravans will pass that way any time soon.  Choosing instead to pass on through our kingdom into Osyrae, and few will bother to move the other way.  Nohlend has a better market for Osyrean goods.”

“A huge disruption to the trade routes,” Laurel agreed.  “Who knows how many years it will persist.  If no one uses the road, then no one will gain confidence it is safe.  All the while we are forced to patrol a useless thoroughfare.”

“Further we will have little access to goods from the east, as Niven will consume most long before caravans reach us from the south.”  The King grimaced.

“We could consider finishing the east pass,” the Queen suggested.

“The expense of that though,” the King shook his head.  “Even the Empire abandoned the notion, and it is a ruin hundreds of years old.”

“I do not believe it undoable,” Arlen offered.

“Would Helm agree to cutting a new road to meet it though?” Laurel mused.  “The pass alone would be a challenge, but fruitless if it is a road to nowhere.”

“I’ve no opinion of the disposition of Helm,” Arlen consented.

“It is possible that they would be willing for greater access to the grains of South Rook,” the Queen suggested.

“I am less sure,” Laurel said.  “There are many barons in Helm that have long sought greater independence from Avrale’s bounty.  It’s been so since I lived on those roads.”

“We could at least investigate the pass, and gauge the cost,” the King considered.

“You have a good report with Fenlin and Castor, don’t you?” the Queen began, turning to Arlen.  “Could you make a recommendation to them on the idea.  Perhaps they can lend not only funds to such an endeavor, in their benefit, but also have some sway with the barons of Helm.”

“I shall, if the opportunity presents itself, make conversation on the matter,” Arlen nodded.  “Castor I believe will be in Brokhal this autumn.  I think a private royal audience would have more impact.”

“Such can be easily arranged,” the King laughed.

“Who best to survey the pass though?” Laurel asked.

“Miners from Silvercreek would be easiest,” the Queen suggested.

“The gold miners Seaperch are more skilled,” Arlen countered with some pride.

“A long trip,” Laurel countered.

“Let us send word to both,” the King suggested.  “Two opinions surely cannot hurt.”

“Agreed,” the Queen concurred, making any further argument ill advised.

Laurel nodded.  “Very well, your leave your highnesses,” he said, and at their nod turned to exit through the rear chamber door.  He stopped just outside, and turned to look at a suit of armor, behind which could be seen two little girls, doing a passable, but ineffective job of hiding.  “You two are making quite a habit of snooping.”

Katrisha, and Kiannae slipped out from behind the armor a bit sheepishly.  He gestured for them to follow as he headed towards the west tower.

“There is an east pass?” Kiannae asked.

“Yes,” Laurel answered, “you can see it easily if you look out from any of the eastern towers.”

“Why isn’t it used?” Katrisha asked.

“It was never finished as a road.  The wildlands east of the mountains between Avrale and Helm are untamed.  Many reports of various dire beasts there.  A lot of expense to cut a road through, beyond just the pass.  That is why we would want support from South Rook.  They would benefit highly from such an endeavor.”

“Wouldn’t that also be close to the border of…” Katrisha hesitated forgetting the name of the kingdom south of Helm.

“Of Thebes, yes,” Laurel offered the name.  “They have much less to gain than Helm though.  They get more of their grain from eastern Niven, and we would compete with them for gold and silver exports.  In fact, I expect them to pressure Helm against such an endeavor.”

“What do we get from Helm?” Kiannae asked.

“Fruit mostly,” Laurel answered.  “Though we have vineyards to the west, and many orchards, citrus are prevalent in Helm.  Mostly we get trade from farther east on that road, textiles, and enchanted wares from New Corinthia, and Mordove.  As well as rare delicacies from Palentine.”

“How did the caravans come about?” Katrisha asked.

“The Empire laid the roads, but by some accounts the trade caravans are older.” Laurel answered.  “At any rate, the goal was to unite the once warring peoples of the world more firmly under the Empire.  Mercu would say the Emperor cut his roads along the well worn tracks of the more ancient traders.  That these in turn became the trade princes under the first Emperor.  They trace their lineages as proudly as any Kings.  Some claim to have been of the Maji originally, but I doubt such assertions.  There are few or no mages among them.”

“You traveled with Mercu,” Kiannae began, “with the caravans, didn’t you?”

“I did,” Laurel laughed.  “That’s how I know the trade princes are no mages.  They have to hire people like me, just incase bandits have a rogue mages backing them.  Of course some risk it, but most mages have better avenues of profit than thievery.  Still, even a clumsy hedge mage with enough practice can be a serious threat to common mercenaries.”

“There was a mage among the bandits in the north, wasn’t there?” Katrisha asked.

Laurel stopped, and considered her.  “More snooping I’ve missed,” he said narrowing his eyes.  “Yes, there were wards where their camp was.  The damage to the caravan could leave one suspect, but the wards were unmistakable.  Not the work of an unskilled mage either.”  He made no mention of the battle field they had found, or the unnerving aspect that one or more powerful mages were in play.  No sense starting into that if they did not already know.

“So why would he work with thieves?” Kiannae pressed.

“I think you know the reason,” Laurel countered, glad it seemed they had not learned the scope of the matter for the moment.

“Because Osyrae was behind it?” Katrisha offered.

“Our standing assumption,” Laurel nodded.  “Though why they went to such efforts I am unsure.  They gain a little advantage in the trade routes, but that hardly seems their end goal.  The Council refuses to consider my assessment of Osyrean involvement.  It would warrant action on their part, and they do not want to act.”

“Why?” Kiannae said scrunching up her face.

Laurel waved for them to continue following, and checked that no one was in earshot.  “Because even seriously investigating the matter could escalate the whole thing.  We do not want war, the Council want’s it less.  Osyrae has nearly as many mages as the rest of the kingdoms combined.  Though to be fair their internal politics and dragon presence keeps many occupied securing them against the two black flights.”

“Why are there two flights?” Katrisha asked.

“Because after the death of the Vhale, his Queen and highest General split over who had the right to rule Osyrae.  The Empress, or more over her generals cut an agreement – with her consent – between the human heir to Osyrae, and the two rival leaders of the black flight.  That has secured relative peace between Osyrae and the rest of the world for centuries.  Baring largely internal struggles.”

“And that is why it is bad for Osyrae that their king is meddling with dragons?” Kiannae asked.

“Very bad for them,” Laurel said grimly.  “Though the flights look down on lesser dragons, the risk is still high of them taking offense.  Even if Osyrae descends into its own Dragon War, the outcome could be very bad for everyone else.  If a single victor arose between the two flights, that could spell an end to the stalemate, and a return to a reigning dragon in Osyrae.”

“Who might be willing to start a war?” Katrisha questioned uneasily.

“Isn’t Vharen trying to start a war by attacking caravans though?” Kiannae interjected before Laurel could answer.

“Yes, and seemingly.”  Laurel sighed as they entered the base of the tower.  “I feel as though Vharen is trying to goad us into action.  The King will not take such bait though.  Wounded, and insulted as our nation is to do nothing, to act would defy our treaties, and the Council would turn on us…almost everyone would turn on us.  Avrale as a whole could be handed to Osyrae to keep the peace.”

“That’s insane,” Katrisha snapped.

Laurel stopped, and leaned against the curved outer wall of the tower near a window.  “Such is the nature of politics.”  He shook his head.  “All we can do is patrol our borders, and our roads, or perhaps forge a new road to avoid the old eastern one.”

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Rhaeus 39th, 640 E.R.

Laurel stopped just inside the twins bedroom chamber.  The circle of runes before him was strange, complex, seemingly meant to go unnoticed, and extended to the ceiling.  It pushed the limits of what he had taught the girls, and its purpose was all but completely obtuse to him.  “What in the fates are you two doing?” he demanded aloud.

“Navi was here again,” Kiannae said.

“We decided to see if we could catch her,” Katrisha answered.

Laurel shook his head.  “No one has ever been able to catch a ghost,” he reproved them.

“They are closely associated with magic,” Kiannae said.  “It seems reasonable that a spell could interact with them.”

“Well, assuming you manage something, be sure it won’t hurt her,” Laurel laughed, mostly humoring them.  He doubted very much they would accomplish anything, but he put little past the two with absolute certainty.

Katrisha flicked a light sphere across the room which passed into the circle, there was a flash as the spell triggered, and the sphere bounced around for a moment seemingly undisrupted.  “It’s just designed to be resistant to passing filaments after a spell passes through.”

“Clever,” Laurel acknowledged.  It made sense enough, but nothing like it had ever worked from his reading.  “You’ve lessons to be doing though, rather than fooling with unproven spells.”

“Alright,” they both said, and reset their spell before returning to their assignments from Moriel.

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Dinner that night was as it often was, with the whole gathered royal family, and many knights, and other minor members of the court.  Katrisha, and Kiannae found themselves opposite Charles to no one’s obvious pleasure.  They were however much more amiable towards Princess Maraline who sat next to them.  They had over the years inherited several dresses she had outgrown, though they prefered to wear robes, like Laurel.

Her cousin Philip on the other hand prefered the company of Charles, and as such the two sides of the table largely ignored one another, save that Darion’s son, the younger Crown Prince, Adrien had no qualms conversing with either group, and could be ignored by none lightly, given his rank.

“I’m to visit South Rook soon,” Maraline offered, glancing towards Katrisha.  “Mother wishes me to spend more time there, she hopes the Duke’s son will take a greater liking to me.”

“Do you like him though?” Katrisha asked.

“Lukus seems nice,” Maraline said noncommittally.  “Nicer than the Duke himself certainly.”

“I’m surprised you have not been tasked with whispering things in his ear to nudge his father to help with the east pass,” Adrien commented.

“Who says I have not?” Maraline laughed lightly.  “For what good it would do.  Poor boy almost cried the last time we met over how little his father respects him.”

“He’s young yet,” Adrien offered.  “I’m sure he will manage to impress the Duke eventually.”

“I do not think anything impresses Duke Fenlin,” Maraline said with a mischievous smile.  “I’m sure if the Avatar himself deigned to parade through the streets of South Rook, he would find it quaint.”

“I do not doubt this at all,” Adrien agreed.  “Perhaps poor Lukus is doomed entirely.”  He glanced across the table.  “What do you think Charles.  Will your father convince Baron Castor to buy into the venture?”

Charles looked up from his conversation with Philip, and seemed dubious.  “He might, but I’ve a feeling the whole thing is a loss.  He was very displeased with one of the hires from Seaperch the other day.  Sounded as though exploratory attempts to clear some slides in the pass have collapsed sections of the rockbed into underlying caverns.  More bridges will be needed at least.”

“Oh my,” Adrien frowned.  “No, that would be a problem.”

“I’ve heard there was an unpleasant run in with a dire bear,” Kiannae offered.

“That I believe was just a regular bear,” Adrien shook his head.  “Still not a friendly though – possibly rabid.”

“I’d rather a rabid dire bear than to hear another speech from Duke Fenlin,” Maraline groaned.  “He was preaching so fervently at dinner last I was in South Rook, that I could see spittle from his lips shower the roast.”

“Eww,” Katrisha scrunched up her face.

“Oh yes, and then I was offered more of the roast,” Maraline laughed.  “I very politely declined.”

“Don’t we need the east pass?” Kiannae pressed.

“I think so,” Adrien said.  “Yet needing, and getting are not always the same.  If the costs are too high, or the challenges too great…  We can survive I think being cut off from Helm for a few years.”

“The real problem,” Charles offered, “I think is more that few caravans will be going into Niven, the flow naturally goes north currently.”

“Yes, I suppose so,” Adrien acknowledged.  “I’d not thought of that.”

“We’ve all we really need though, don’t we?” Katrisha offered.

“Yes,” Adrien nodded.  “Good trade is advantageous though.  The North will be poorer for this, not that there are so many living there now.  Still the drought must end eventually.  Perhaps by then the caravans will be willing to risk the east road once more.”

“Or we could install a proper duke in the north,” Charles said, and got a dirty look from both twins.

“The North has done fine without,” Adrien said.

“Not so fine,” Charles countered.

“Save the drought,” Adrien shook his head, “nothing a duke could do to help.  They did well managing things in the beginning.  Honestly the drain on resources from royalty could only have made things worse.  I hope we never have such trouble in the south.”

“Unlikely,” Kiannae said.  “The climate in the north has been impacted by a shift in the high winds, this has driven most of the rain into the highlands near Mt Saeah.  South Rook is perched in such mountain ranges, however the winds shift the rain still comes.  Though the forests to the east, or Thebes could suffer.”

“Interesting,” Adrien nodded.  “I think I heard Laurel explain that once, but I couldn’t follow how he said it.  Your version was much clearer.”

Kiannae smiled, and returned to her food, but Katrisha caught Adrien considering her sister a moment longer.  She found this curious till she caught Charles staring at her, and gave him an unfriendly look which spurred him to return to his plate.

“Do you two think you will ever travel?” Maraline asked.

“I think I want to,” Kiannae said.  “See the world.”

“Oh adventurous,” Maraline said excitedly.  “I just meant the kingdom.”

“Is there so much to see?” Katrisha asked.

“Oh South Rook is very impressive,” Marlaine said with eager earnestness.  “Everything is so tall.”

“I prefer Wesrook,” Charles said.

“But you were born there, of course,” Maraline countered.  “The ocean is nice though, I’ll admit.  I’ve only been once.”

“I got to visit Nohrook once,” Philip interjected.  “You can see forever from the top of the tower.  Cities across the plains of Osyrae.  That is why no army has ever marched unseen on Avrale.”

“From the north at least,” Adrien said.

“Or from the south,” Maraline added.  “Though you cannot see down the pass from South Rook, the villages down the southern slopes can see anything coming up from Niven.”

“The fleets of Wesrook hold the sea,” Charles offered.

“And of course nothing comes from the East,” Philip said.  “Which is why we are trying to fix that.  Though I’d think a new Rook would be in order if we finished the pass.”

“I believe the King has considered that,” Adrien agreed.  “Though where is the question.  None would be overly pleased to hold a lonely tower, and there is so little to support a proper town through that pass.  Unless mineral veins are found, even tin could prove valuable enough.  Failing that perhaps in the lower reaches of the far side – hunting the wildlands…though Helm claims most of them.  Still I think the upper hills are strictly ours.  The treaty is very vague since no one really lives there.”

“I’m sure if the pass is completed we will come to some agreement,” Philip suggested.

“And without one,” Charles said, “we’ve the high ground in our favor.”

“Perish the thought,” Adrien said with a stricken expression.  “We’ve no wish of a squabble with Helm.”

“They would seem the aggressors,” Charles countered.  “The Council might expand our borders in recompense.”

“And you would wish such a thing?” Maraline glared at him.  “What of those that might die in such a contest?”

Charles looked as though he wished to protest her opinion, but merely lowered his head.

“Further we need Helm’s help for the eastern pass to succeed,” Katrisha said.  “The point is trade.  How much do you think there would be if the Council took lands from Helm, and gave them to us?”

“I merely wished to consider the possibility that we would not lose in such an event,” Charles said firmly.  “Of course I would not want a war, just showing that we have the advantage.”

“I do agree with that assessment,” Adrien said diplomatically.  “Better to have no battles fought, but if we could not avoid them, knowing we would win is comforting.”

“If only we had such comfort about Osyrae,” Maraline said sadly.

“I find the mater perplexing,” Philip said.  “Not that they tell us much.  Yet if King Heron was really killed by his brother, a man who seems by all accounts obsessed with the old ways, what is his game?”

“He wants the support of dragons,” Kiannae offered.

“And thankfully there is little chance of him getting it,” Adrien said.  “As if their great General or Queen would bow to an unproven mortal.”

“And that, for better or worse,” Katrisha said thoughtfully, “is why he is trying to prove himself.”

“And let us hope that he only proves himself flammable,” Maraline proposed grabbing her cup, and holding it up.  The others all raised theirs to this, including adults near nearby who had overheard the children’s conversation.

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Jovan 3rd, 640 E.R.

Days of setting a trap for Navi had failed to accomplish anything.  The twins had all but agreed to give it up, before returning to their room one day, and finding the trap triggered but empty.  Several of the runes had however been nudged around, the arrangement forming an arrow that simply pointed down.

“What does it mean?” Katrisha asked curiously.

“Not a clue,” Kiannae offered.  “Other than the obvious.”

“Do you think Laurel did this?” Katrisha considered thoughtfully.

“Mercu maybe?” Kiannae countered.

“Do you even think he could?” Katrisha pressed.

“Maybe if he tried very hard?” Kiannae said uncertainly.

“What’s down though?” Katrisha said rhetorically.

“Storage rooms…lots of things.”

“Even assuming it were a prank, it would be meant to be a message from Navi,” Katrisha said.  “The tower she built was destroyed.  So, maybe all the way down?”

“There is a door at the very bottom,” Kiannae said thoughtfully.

“I never went below the lower hall,” Katrisha mused.

“I asked Laurel about it once,” Kiannae said thoughtfully.  “He said it was just an old stone down there.  Historical significance or something.  Nothing that sounded interesting.”

“We could go check,” Katrisha suggested.

“The door is locked.”  Kiannae shook her head.

“So?” Katrisha laughed.  “We know how to operate the latch on Laurel’s study, I’m sure a lock wouldn’t be too hard.”

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

It was not a particularly complicated lock.  Really only a simple catch, and turning it proved little more complicated than opening the study.  Inside however was complete darkness.  Katrisha, and Kiannae summoned lights that drifted about them as they walked into the room beneath the tower.  There was loose stone here and there, and even old planks piled against a wall.  It was at once an eerie place, and seemingly quite uninteresting.  Save a large stone that occupied the center of the main chamber.

The two walked up to it curiously.  It was covered in dust, that mostly filled the faint hint of lines carved into its surface.  They looked like the lines, and runes of a spell, but there was no discernible magic.  Kiannae brushed away some of the dust, and looked more closely at the markings.

“How strange,” Katrisha said, doing the same.  “What do you think it is?”

“I don’t know,” Kiannae said.  “I almost feel something, but I can’t see any magic.”

“How long do you think it has been here?”

“Longer than the tower maybe?” Kiannae suggested uncertainly.

“Than the old one you mean?” Katrisha asked.

“Yeah, why not?”  Kiannae said.  “I mean it looks like the stone is really part of the hillside, and that the tower was built around it.”

Katrisha brushed away more of the dust.  “Did Laurel really say nothing else about it?”

“I think he said it was a marker, something about…lines, shamans, I don’t know.”

“But I thought shamans didn’t do magic?”

“Yeah, by definition,” Kiannae said curiously.  “Sure looks like a spell, but with no obvious magic any more, there is no telling what it was for.”  She held her hand against the stone, and closed her eyes, trying very hard to feel a strange sensation nipping at the edge of her awareness.

Katrisha did the same, and for a moment neither really felt anything.

“Ow,” Katrisha yelped with surprise, yanking her hand back.

“What?” Kiannae asked.

“I don’t know, it started to feel hot,” Katrisha said shaking her hand.  “I didn’t notice, and then suddenly it hurt.  My whole arm feels warm.”  She stared at her hand.  “Does my arm look brighter to you, the arua I mean?”

Kiannae walked over, and considered her sister’s arm.  “Maybe just a little?”

“I thought I heard something down here,” Laurel said stepping into the room behind her, his own light following him.  “What are you two doing?”

“Our ghost trap,” Katrisha started, and hesitated.

“Someone rearranged the runes into an arrow, it pointed down,” Kiannae finished.

“And so you decided to poke around in a locked room?” Laurel pressed.

“Well,” Katrisha said, “I mean if the message really was from Navi…”

“Or supposed to be,” Kiannae said weightedly.

“Yeah, either Navi, or you, or Mercu wanted us to look down here.”

“Wasn’t me,” Laurel said curiously.  “Mercu maybe, but if it was, I don’t get the joke.”

“What is it?” Katrisha asked.

“Just an old marker stone,” Laurel said walking over, and crouching down to look at the markings himself.  “No one really knows who made them, but they are found along ley lines, and at nexuses.”

“What are ley lines again?” Kiannae asked.

“Or nexuses?” Katrisha added.

“Well,” Laurel laughed, “nothing all that important.  There are variations in the energy fields of the world.  They form lines, and those lines have to cross somewhere.  There are slight advantages when performing grand acts with the gift to being on a line, or at a nexus.  This here is where at least five lines converge.  One runs almost perfectly parallel with the cliff.  Some theorize that isn’t a coincidence.  Yet how or why Broken Hill was broken is…well no one really has a good idea.  Still the name itself implies some truth to it.”

“Why can’t we feel anything then?” Kiannae asked.

“Like I said, it’s mostly a slight difference,” Laurel answered, standing back up.  “But you’ve lived here almost your whole lives.  I can barely feel it any more myself, even down here.  We are just used to it.”

“It burned when I held my hand on the stone for a while,” Katrisha said.

Laurel gave her a funny look.  “That would be a new one.  Are you sure?”

Katrisha held out her left and right arms.  “It feels like it’s fading, but do the auras of my arms look different to you?”

“A bit,” Laurel said curiously.  “Your right seems brighter…a little…bluer.”

“That’s the one I had on the stone,” Katrisha said.

“I’ve never heard of such a thing,” Laurel shook his head.  “Are you sure this isn’t some kind of weird joke?”

Katrisha got a funny look on her face, and stared past Kiannae, and Laurel.  The two finally glanced behind themselves, but there was nothing there.  “What?” Laurel pressed.

“I…nothing,” Katrisha said a bit distantly.  She had seen Navi standing there for a moment.  She had looked at her, smiled, and held a finger to her lips before dispersing.  “If it’s a joke, we aren’t in on it.”

“Come on, let’s get out of this stuffy old place,” Laurel said pointing towards the door.  “And no more picking locks.”

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

That night as Katrisha slept she dreamt of the stars.  It was a familiar dream, at once comfortable, and unsettling.  She felt very alone, and sad about something, but she could not remember what.  It was a sky she did not know, and yet in the dream she did.  She could name all the stars in those heavens far better than those above Avrale, though the names never stuck.

She glanced some distance away.  A boy, and a girl she did not recognize sat there.  She could not decide if they were arguing, or merely discussing.  Each pointed to one star or another.  She did not trust them, and yet felt that they were just children, small, insignificant, and somehow her responsibility.  There was a sense of annoyance at this. They faded away, and there was only the sky.  She felt very alone.

She closed her eyes, and saw not stars, but lines, a pattern that stretched out before her eyes.  She no longer felt alone, it was as though there were shadows around her, tugging at the lines like puppet strings, but at once no one seemed there.  She opened her eyes again, and nothing changed.  No stars, no one there, just the lines.  She could see how something flowed along those lines.

“How?” it was like a whisper.  “Who else is meddling now?”  Katrisha looked around, and saw nothing still, just lines that spread in every direction.  She could feel a presence, but could not see it.  “You shouldn’t be here, not yet,” the voice said.  “Please go.”  It was oddly pleading.

“Who are you?” Katrisha demanded.

“Just a dream,” the voice said.

“I don’t believe you,” Katrisha said.

“Always too clever,” the voice seemed half amused.  “Just think of the stars.  It’s better.  This is prophecy, and you want nothing to do with that.”

“Prophecy?” Katrisha asked uncertainly.  She thought she had heard the word, but only in passing.

“Threads in motion,” the voice said, “you never know whether you are seeing them spiral together, or drift apart.  I really don’t want you thinking about this.  I prefered not knowing this.”

“I don’t understand,” Katrisha almost growled.

“Good.  Stars, just think about them, or the moon – you love her right?”

The command had some effect, and almost as soon as she closed her eyes, she was staring at a starry sky again.  Still one she did not know, and still somehow familiar.  For a moment she wondered what she had just been thinking, or saying.  It bothered her, but not so much as the loneliness.  She felt like she was missing someone.  Where was Kiannae?

Katrisha woke with a start, her head foggy.  She glanced around in the dark room.  Her sister was asleep next to her.  She rubbed her eyes, and looked at the trap they had set.  Faintly her eyes focused on Navi standing before it.  She cocked her head to one side, then the other, drifted around until she was behind it, and faced towards Katrisha.

The ghost’s expression was placid, like someone lost in thought, until it seemed her eyes fell on Katrisha.  She smiled, and though she didn’t frown, it seemed a sad smile.  She stepped into the trap, which went off, growing bright around her.  She nodded, and then disappeared in a swirl of light, and the trap dissolved with her.

Katrisha pursed her lips, all the less sure what to make of any of it.  Her arm felt warm again, and the only thing she could remember from her dream was feeling alone.  She curled up to her sister, who stirred slightly, and grabbed the arm draped over her.  Katrisha felt a bit better, but still struggled to fall back asleep.

Some stars flicked before her eyes as they closed, she felt as though they all had names, but none she could remember.  There was one, bright like lamp in the dark, warm like the sun.  It had a name – she was sure – yet the name eluded her, only it’s meaning, ‘My Light.’  It was a very pretty star she decided, and finally found sleep again.

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Jovan 4th, 640 E.R.

“Where’s the trap?” Kiannae asked her sleeping sister, who barely stirred.

“What?” Katrisha murmured.

“The trap is gone,” Kiannae said.

Katrisha blinked several times, and glanced across the room where the trap had been.  She only vaguely remembered seeing the ghost dissolve along with it.  “Navi…dispelled it I think,” Katrisha answered.

“Really?” Kiannae said incredulously.

“I think so,” Katrisha said.

“But Laurel said…”

“I think we should stop trying,” Katrisha said, shaking her head.

“Do you think we are bothering her?” Kiannae asked.

“I don’t know,” Katrisha said.  “Something…I just feel like we are going to cause trouble.”

Kiannae clearly didn’t like the answer.  Katrisha took her hand.  “Can we just not?  Leave her be, I feel like we should.”

“Ok,” Kiannae sighed.

“Thanks,” Katrisha said, and rubbed her face.

“I’m hungry,” Kiannae said, and Katrisha’s belly grumbled before she could answer for herself.

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Breakfast was a more subdued affair than dinners typically were.  People came, and went at varied times.  Only King John, and Aria were eating when the twins arrived.  Both considered the two curiously.

“It does not seem like the two of you to be up so early,” the King said, as the two sat across from the princess.

“We were hungry,” Kiannae said.

“Well, that does sound more like them,” Aria offered.

“Indeed,” the King said with some amusement.

A servant brought plates with pancakes, topped in butter, and set them before the girls.  The princess nudged the syrup pitcher closer to where they could reach it.  Katrisha poured a sizable amount over her’s, and Kiannae followed.

“I still wish it had worked,” Kiannae said, even as her sister began eating.

“What had worked?” Aria asked curiously.

“We’ve been trying to catch a ghost,” Kiannae answered, and took a bite herself.

“You’ve been troubling the White Lady?” the King said a bit startled.

“To be fair I don’t think she was much troubled,” Katrisha answered.  “She seemed more inclined to meddle with our trap than get caught.”

“Seriously you jest,” Aria said a bit shocked.  “Ghosts can’t do such things.”

“Also, I’ll have no trapping of royalty in my castle,” the King said sternly.  “Alive or otherwise.”

“We’ve given up,” Kiannae said a bit sadly.

“Good,” the King said.  “I’ll not have some foolish mages trying to capture my ghost when I am gone.  I would be very…” he stopped as a servant hurried in, and seemed to be headed towards him.

“There’s been another collapse up in the east pass,” the servant said.  “Reports of injuries this time.”

“Fates,” the King said standing up, and wiping his mouth.  “Send riders for healers, immediately.”

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Jovan 5th, 640 E.R.

Renae ran her hand over one of the many wounded quartered in rooms of the castle.  She glanced at Idolus who was working on another man, and looked back to her own patient.  “Incompetent,” she muttered under her breath, and tried to figure out what to do about the bone in the man’s leg.  The alignment had been off when it had been healed.  And re-breaking it would be cruel, but if it was not fixed he would easily break it again, and probably walk with a limp even if not.   What remained would be to carefully reshape it, which would take an hour at least.

“We’ll need to work on this later,” Renae said to the man, “but you will be fine,” she reassured him.  He nodded, and she moved onto the next patient, who looked a bit uncomfortable to have a four year old examining his arm.

“What do you feel?” Renae asked.

“I’m not sure,” Wren said.  “Something…not right.”

She ran her hand over the arm, examining the interior carefully.  The bone was fine, she could feel where the break had been, but it had set properly before being healed.  She probed around it, trying to understand what Wren might have felt wrong.  She considered he might just be too new, but checked again, finally finding the clot amidst the swelling.  It was inside the vein, and threatened to easily break lose.

“Oh,” she said, swallowed, and carefully dissolved the dangerous thing.  “Good catch honey.  You tell me if you ever feel anything like that again.”  The man looked concerned.  “You’ll be fine sir.  Just a little clot, all better now.”

Renae caught Idolus moving at the corner of her vision, and saw the hateful look on his face, directed at her.  Her blood nearly boiled, and she made herself look to the next patient.  His face was a bit swollen on one side, and he was clearly having trouble opening that eye.

“Hello,” he said in an overly friendly tone.

Renae nodded, and checked his head.  Nothing significant was wrong, but the residual swelling would take some effort to lower.  “Wren, feel what I do,” she said, and began working to mend the inflamed tissue.  Wren put his hand over Renae’s, and tried to pay attention.

“That feels very nice,” the man said.  “Don’t often get such attention from a pretty lady.”

“As if you can see me,” Renae chided, and the man’s eye opened a bit more.

“Well, I do now,” he laughed.  “Little girl yours?”

“My son,” Renae said pointedly, “is learning to be a healer.”

“Ah,” the man laughed, “sorry boy.”  Wren gave both a funny look.  “And sorry to you too, ma’am.”

“It’s fine,” Renae reassured him as the swelling continued to go down.  “I keep telling him we should cut his hair, but he doesn’t like it.”

“I like my hair,” Wren said firmly.

“Don’t blame you kid,” the man said patting the top of his head which had a receding hairline.  “Maybe I’d have kept more if I cut it less.”

“Doesn’t work that way,” Renae said.

“Oh good,” the man laughed, “not my fault.  More than I can say for the slide.  I told that damn fool from Silvercreek I didn’t like the way he’d set the charges.  He didn’t listen…I should have made him.”

“Doesn’t sound like your fault really,” Renae offered reassuringly.

“Just wish I had stuck to my instincts,” he said distantly.  “Others got it worse than me though.”

“There you go,” Renae said.  “How’s your head feel?”

“Much better,” the man said, and sat up.  He rubbed where his face had been swollen.  “Bit tingly, and…huh sensitive, but not in a bad way.”

“That’ll go away in a day or so,” Renae said.

“Shame,” the man said with a wry smile.  “Anything I can do for you?”

“The order always welcomes donations,” Renae said, and started to move on.  “Nothing you can’t easily afford of course,” she added.

A man groaned some distance away, and Renae stopped and stared at Idolus irritably.  “Do you do nothing for the pain?” she demanded, and at first it seemed almost like he did not hear her.

Idolus looked up after a moment however.  “Life is pain, it is good to be reminded, lest we forget, and cling when the time comes.”

“Leave that man right this instant,” Renae snapped, and marched toward Idolus.

“I will do no such thing,” Idolus said furiously.

“You are unfit to call yourself a healer,” Renae growled.

“I…” Idolus seethed, and the man he was healing yelped as he lost focus.  “You are little more than a whore.  You do worse than corrupt by merely being what you are, you actively seek corruption, and worm it under the skin of everyone around you.”

“Corruption?” Renae all but roared.  “How much are you charging the King to care for these men?  By the day, by the hour, by the injury?  You are the whore, you disgusting vulture, leave before I break my vows and strangle you.”

A guard entered uncertainty, and eyed the two healers that stood above a wounded man, seemingly ready to come to blows.  “What is the matter?” the guard asked, far from unaware, but at a lack of any other options to mediate a situation he did not wish to to deal with by force.  There did not seem a good way for that to go.

“Guard,” Renae commanded.  “Escort this defective, spiteful thing from this room.  Preferably from this castle.  He has no business tending to wounded.  I will attend everyone myself if I must, it will do no more harm than allowing him to lay his hands on them any further.”

“Ma’am,” the guard said, “I don’t answer to you.  He’s here at the invitation of the King.”

Eran entered then.  “I’d do as the lady says.”

“Sir?” the guard asked uncertainly.

“Abyss take you all,” Idlous snapped, and marched from the room furiously.

“Thank you,” Renae said, and turned to the patient Idolus had been working on.

“Figure they’ll heal better without his help,” Eran offered.

“Are you competent at all?” Renae asked.

“I…not much,” Eran said.  “I did what I could for the worst, and the first arrivals, but while I may have a better bedside manner than Idolus, I’m not even half the healer.  Figured I’d best stay out of it once he showed.”

“Can you at least triage, look for anything he’s botched too badly?” Renae asked.

“Yes Ma’am,” Eran nodded.  “You can go soldier,” he said to the guard, who gave him a funny look, and left.

“Start at the far end, and if you would show Wren what you find, and how to find it.  I need to focus on getting things done.”

“I’ll do my best,” Eran said, and considered the little boy who looked up at him expectantly.

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Jovan 25th, 640 E.R.

“The only fatalities died instantly, four total,” Arlen reported, “no thanks to interference in the infirmary.” He sneered slightly.  “We’ve only just now recovered the last of the bodies.”

“The pass itself?” the King asked, ignoring the aside.

“Worse for wear I’m afraid,” Arlen answered.  “We lost a huge section of the hillside in a secondary slide.  Another bridge, and not one that will be easy to build.  I’ve been given recommendations for an alternate route, but it isn’t that much more promising.”

“At this point do you honestly still have a case that this project is worth it?”  Laurel pressed.

“If we had confirmation from Helm that they will build a road to us,” Arlen answered.  “Right now it seems they are unwilling to commit to anything, until they see us succeed with the pass.  We’ve full commitment from South Rook to fund half the project, but that was with old estimates.  I will admit I am losing faith in the idea.”

“Then it is a question of how We abandon this gracefully,” the King said unhappily.

“If we can convince caravans to return to the eastern road, the cost of the construction would clearly not be worth it,” Laurel suggested.

“And can We do that?” the King pressed.  “You know the trade princes better than Us.”

“We can try,” Laurel said.  “If we stop trying to make progress, and pull back to simply investigate the pass more passively, that might buy us some time to try.”

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