Chapter 9

Good traveler hear,
words for the wise,
and journey in numbers,
if you value your lives,

for along all the roads,
more and less traveled,
stand hills ‘n groves,
that harbor deep shadow,

and from these places,
convenient ‘n obscure,
may spring bandits, dragons,
or beasts yet unheard.

– old caravan rhyme, circa 350 E.R.

Sisters of the Road

Vhalun 37th, 641 E.R.

Mercu watched Katrisha and Kiannae entertain themselves, and one another alternately.  The two girls rarely did the same thing at once any more, opting instead to show off for their mutual amusement, and often Mercu’s.  He pondered how much the two had grown in four years.

Katrisha for her part had become very fond of a trick to make small orbs of light attract each other, and further take less effort to touch and grab hold of.  Before her danced a half dozen or so such orbs of varied size and color.  The largest hovered stationary, as the others zipped around it, and each other in intricate arcs, and spirals.  Ever so often she would nudge, slow, or grab one to radically alter its trajectory.

Mercu had seen Laurel do similar things over the years, but his more prosaic displays were generally meant to match the exact behavior of real astronomical bodies.  Katrisha’s displays were often more intriguing for their playful artistry, and unusual eccentric orbits.  Even if this chaos and experimentation frequently lead to strays flying off through walls, and needing to be remade by their disgruntled mistress.

Though Kiannae had at times done the same, she was more fond of making swirling twisting patterns of light in the air.  Mercu had tried without much success to convince her to express her intricate forms with paint, or charcoal.  The results however, even barring the obvious disadvantage of not being luminescent, three dimensional forms, further lacked the same precision and grace.  She seemed over all uninterested in spending the time to learn the coordination it would take to match what she could do by intent alone.

A stray orb careened out of its previous tight orbit, and through a flowery display of intricately twined light, causing a momentary explosion of brilliant swirls.  Mercu braced himself for Kiannae to be very cross with her sister, but saw both girls transition from surprise to amusement as the fireworks of the collision evolved, and settled.

“How would you two like to come into the village with me today?” he asked before the two could get too deeply enthralled in their entertainments again.  Both looked to him with expressions of distinct disbelief.

“Really?” Kiannae asked uncertainly.

“You always say we can’t come,” Katrisha added hesitantly.

“This time I asked Laurel very nicely,” Mercu laughed, “and with the utmost of begrudging muttering, he relented to allow you two off the castle grounds.”

With that reassurance the girls bounded from their respective places, and were at Mercu’s side in a heartbeat.  “I will take that as a yes then?” he chuckled.

Both nodded, no longer risking questioning their good fortune.

“I’ve asked for you two to come along so that you can meet my sister, if you don’t mind.”

“You have a sister?” Kiannae asked obviously a bit confused.

“You never mentioned her,” Katrisha added.

“Didn’t I?” Mercu laughed a bit nervously, “lovely woman too, can’t think why.  I’m sure with you two along the odds of her killing me will go down by at least two thirds.”  The girls both looked a bit concerned at Mercu’s jest.  “No really, she wouldn’t hurt me…well ok she definitely wouldn’t kill me, but I fear it’s nothing I haven’t earned in one way or another.”

“Did you make her mad?” Katrisha asked in an almost scolding tone.

“I made her rich,” Mercu said with a knowing smile, “that’s almost worse.”

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

“Why are we walking?” Katrisha grumbled, and kicked a small rock down the road ahead of her.

“Because it’s good for you,” Mercu answered.

“How much farther?” Kiannae asked.

“Two more miles,” Mercu shrugged.  In truth he had tried to arrange a coach, but too much was going on.  However good he was at getting what he wanted, he was still very low on the ladder compared to official business.  The three mile walk was hardly his first choice, but he would never hear the end of it if he didn’t make the trek.  He began humming to himself absently as they walked on.

“What’s that?” Kiannae asked after a few minutes.

“Hmmm?” Mercu questioned looking to see if she was pointing at something.

“The song,” Katrisha clarified for her sister.

“Oh – just an old Palentine tune,” Mercu said dismissively.  “Gets stuck in my head sometimes.”

“I don’t recognize it,” Kiannae pressed.  “What is it?”

“Let me see if I remember all the words,” Mercu said thoughtfully – then began to sing:

“A minstrel girl to war hath gone,
still plying her bow ‘n strings,
she’s pierced near the hearts,
with arrows as songs,
the minstrel girl of Dawn,

Lost a father for bread,
her mother for scorn,
armed with fiddle ‘fore bow,
long after adored everyone,
that little dear in Dawn,

O’ With sorrow she strung,
ne’re a tear she shed,
each eve her cup was full,
great ‘n small hung their head,
for the songbird proud of Dawn,

Of age she was comely,
and keen of the eye,
come one way or another,
none could pass there by,
great lady come from Dawn,

They crooned of her voice,
the song of her bow,
the curve of her chest,
the grace of her draw,
fair hero born of Dawn.

She’s up on that hill,
where she tarried her days,
‘nother grave there beside,
prince or pauper none say,
who married a girl from Dawn.

So stand all good folk,
as a fierce lass once did,
utter take not another,
cry yet take me instead,
for home, for country, for Dawn.”

“Why doesn’t anyone know who married her?” Katrisha asked, as Mercu trailed off on Dawn.

“No one is really sure if she even existed,” Mercu answered.  “If she did, it was very, very long ago.  Centuries before the Empire at least.  Still there are two graves on the eastern hill above Dawn.  I’ve seen them myself.”

“Don’t they have names?” Kiannae prodded.

“I said very long ago,” Mercu laughed.  “You know the expression, ‘written in stone?’”

“Yes,” Katrisha said incredulously.

“Of course,” Kiannae protested.

“Well what does it mean?” Mercu countered.

“Permanent?” Katrisha offered.

“Even what is written in stone is not forever.”  Mercu shrugged.  “That the locals have kept the hill clear, and the graves from being completely overgrown is a wonder itself.  There’re marks on the gravestones, if you wipe away the moss.  Written in script so old no one knows it, and so eroded by the rain that even if one could read ancient Palentian you couldn’t make a thing of it.  They might as well be a few more scores cut by the rain.”

“If she married a prince wouldn’t there be a record?”  Kiannae countered.

“Oh yes – there probably would have been.  Yet there were so many, and they lived, and died, and castles burned, and lineages were forgotten, and true enough a couple wouldn’t you know it have claimed that it was one of their ancestors the song is about.  Course not a one can prove it.”

“What was the bit about losing her father for bread, and her mother for scorn?” Katrisha asked.

“It’s all sketchy.  The stories say she was the daughter of a common minstrel, very poor save his precious instrument.  He taught her to play, but could not keep food on the table.  He stole some bread to feed her – and wound up dead.”

“Over bread!?” Katrisha said furiously.

“The world is not always fair, or kind,” Mercu answered, and neither girl seemed satisfied.

“What about her mother?”  Kiannae asked.

“Stories vary – not all versions are quite polite.  Some say she blamed her daughter, or herself, went mad, or…well never mind,” Mercu was thoughtful.  “In the end the girl was left alone.  They say her sorrowful playing in the square filled her cup every day.”

“And then she became an archer?” Kiannae asked.

“Yes.  Dawn was always caught in the struggles between ancient Nohlend and Old Palentine.  The stories say – as the closing verse implies – that she volunteered, and became a great archer.  That not only did she offer to serve, but demanded to when first, second, and even trice refused.”

“Why would they refuse her?” Katrisha frowned.

“Because she was a young girl.  They gave her a bow ostensibly to keep her out of trouble.”

“Hmph,” Kiannae protested.

“Oh I quite agree – but that very arrogance helped earn her her fame.  When men were shrinking from the fight, men who thought so little of women, let alone a small girl, she stood up.  She pledged her life to the very people that had cost her her parents.  So there are noble families that squabble to own her legacy a thousand years later.”

“But she was just an archer, not a mage?” Katrisha asked.

“She might have had some gift – who can say.  Great warriors of old often did.  There are more practices than we always remember today.  Back then, in the early Age of Kings a little border town like Dawn would easily have let a gift slip through untrained.  And though great Mage Kings were terrors on the battlefield, they needed armies to counter each other’s.”

“Why is it called Dawn?” Kiannae asked.

“Nothing special – just an eastward port on the North Sea – could have been a hundred places with the name.  That one stuck.”

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Katrisha had only the vaguest memory of the village from a morning passage years before.  Yet as vague as her memory was she was quite sure it had not been nearly so busy.  As they passed out of the north side of the village proper she realized there had not been so many large enclosed wagons either.  She had heard that the caravan was in town, but while she knew what that meant functionally, she had never put much thought into what it might look like.

Kiannae, who had slept through the village all those years ago was even more overwhelmed by the diversity of sights, sounds, and people.  It was even more daunting than any of the weddings or balls that had been held at court in her time there.

The trio walked up to an enclosed wagon larger than either girl had ever imagined existed, and Mercu waved enthusiastically.  “Harris, my old friend!” he yelled his arms spread wide as he approached a man sifting through various bundled goods.

The man stood up and turned only to be embraced before he could fully recognize his assailant.  “Mer…Mercu?” Harris said questioningly as he pushed Mercu back, and looked him up and down.  “By the fates it is you, it’s been at least ten years since I saw you last.”

“Oh, more than that I think,” Mercu said with a chuckle.

“Who are those two,” Harris said gesturing to Katrisha, and Kiannae as they walked up behind him.  “You haven’t gone and had children have you?”

“No…though I suppose after a fashion,” Mercu laughed.  “They aren’t my blood, but are about as close as I’m likely to get, I think.”

“Fair enough, I won’t pry,” Harris said considering Mercu shrewdly, “I shouldn’t have been so surprised to see you though, I thought I heard Sam muttering something about her worthless brother other day.”

“Speaking of that, I seek the caravan master!” Mercu laughed.

“Yes, yes of course,” Harris said grabbing a rod that lay nearby, and rapped on the side of the wagon.

“Oi, what in the abyss is it?” a woman’s voice called out after a moment irritably, and a window on the side of the wagon swung open.  A lady with short chestnut hair looked down at Harris, and Mercu, and shook her head.  “Oh, it’s you,” she said dismissively, and yet with an air of surprise.  “I’ve passed through this kingdom no less than five times in the past ten years, and have to come almost to your door to get more than a letter handed to me.”

“It wasn’t the distance, dear Samantha, it was the company,” Mercu shot back.  “When your letter said father had finally retired somewhere out east, I figured it was time I did better by my dear sister.”

“Yes, yes, and I’ll believe your personal convenience had nothing to do with it,” Samantha responded leaning her head on her arm, a wry smile creeping across her lips.

Katrisha and Kiannae slowly inched up beside Mercu, and drew glances from Harris, and Mercu’s sister.  “Believe what you will,” Mercu laughed, “but the convenience of your visit did allow me to bring guests.”

“Are these the two then?” Samantha said smiling down at the twins.

“Indeed they are,” Mercu answered.  “Introduce yourselves girls – you do it so well.”

“I am Katrisha, daughter of the moonlight, and the winter frost,” the first said with a curtsy.

“And I am Kiannae, daughter of summer vales, and the passing storm,” the other proclaimed in turn.

“Well those are curious titles,” Samantha said cocking her head to the side.

“Something their father called them when they were little,” Mercu said, “or so I am told.  At some point I started encouraging the use, seemed fittingly mystical for young mages in training.”

Samantha gracefully hopped onto the windowsill, and slid out, landing in a crouch before the twins.  “You two,” she said grinning wildly, “are darling, and should not allow my wicked treacherous brother to corrupt you any further than he surely already has.”

“I will have you know,” Mercu said in a very officious tone, “that I am tasked with seeing that these two are wholly incorruptible.”

“Then we are all doomed, and the very chief future servants of the abyss stand before us,” Samantha said, throwing up her arms as she straightened up, and stared at her brother incredulously.  Mercu scrunched his face up in a slightly childish manner, obviously displeased to be so quickly besmirched before his young charges.

Samantha cocked her head to the side, frowned slightly at the lack of a witty comeback, and suddenly pounced upon her brother with an abrupt hug, kissing him on the cheek.  “I missed you, you insufferable lout,” she said squeezing him tightly.

She had the most remarkably calming, yet energetic presence.  Like an open field of flowers in summer, wavering in a gentle breeze.  You couldn’t feel it more than a foot away, but it then suddenly washed over you.

“You too dear sister,” Mercu said in a more relaxed tone, and returned the embrace. “I did write, but…I simply couldn’t face father any more.”

“Well you did kind of put him in a bit of a bind, didn’t you?” Samantha said pulling back, and looking her brother square in the eye.

“I only made him do, what deep down in his heart he wanted to, and knew was right,” Mercu offered coyly.

“Oh yes, and thank you for that.  It’s been such a chore convincing traveling merchant’s to follow a woman,” Samantha nearly hissed.  “Do you have any idea how much I miss having long hair?  But no, for some reason these insufferable men – who surround me – give me more respect if I look more like one of them.”

“I always respected you fine,” Harris said as he walked away, having felt his presence was an intrusion for some time.

“Sorry Harris,” Samantha called after him, “I just forget sometimes you are a man.”  Harris noticeably grumbled, and made a strange gesture as he disappeared behind the wagon.

Mercu laughed.  “I was wondering what was up with the hair, but how ever did you come to such a strange conclusion?”

“Well it started with a woman merchant, enchanter by trade,” Samantha said, moved to her brother’s side, and ushered him to walk into town.  She looked down at the two bewildered little girls beside them, and simply said “follow along you two.  I intend to find a drink for my brother and myself – he’s buying.”

Mercu looked as though he wished to object in some way, but simply remained silent as Samantha launched back into her story.  “Now where was I?  Oh yes, the merchant girl.  Sweet lass, simply failed to grasp that I preferred the company of men, however much they may aggravate me.  She kept saying I was repressing something.”

“You, repress something?” Mercu laughed.

“One to talk, dear brother,” Samantha cut back, and tapped him on the nose.  “At some point or another, when we were a bit drunk, she said the short hair makes them think of you less as a woman, makes them listen.  I really just wrote the whole statement off at the time, she was so drunk.  Then there was an incident with some tar…have you ever, in your life, tried to get tar out of hair?”

“No,” Mercu said with a bit of a cringe, “but…how did that happen exactly?”

“One story at a time,” Samantha laughed, “so anyway, not much choice, had to chop it all off you see, god it looked terrible for a while, but it happened at a waypoint where a lot of people were changing out.  Wouldn’t you know it, I had a lot less trouble getting the men to follow directions ever since.  Not night and day mind you, but noticeable – hit on me less too…which eh, blessing and a curse some days.”

“Sounds positively dreadful,” Mercu said in a mock somber tone.

“Eh, not the end of the world.  Slap ’em in the face with the knockers,” Samantha laughed, wiggling her shoulders, “if I really want the attention.  That’ll work nine times out of ten.”

“And the tenth time?” Mercu laughed.

“The tenth time I guess they have no interest in a good pair of knockers,” Samantha chuckled.  “I’d ask if you know what that’s about dear brother…but I forget you have a very broad appreciation in such matters.”

“You are terrible, sister,” Mercu said with a wide grin, “and have the nerve to imply that I will corrupt these darling little girls,” he said glancing back to be sure the uncharacteristically quiet pair were still following.  They were, and to his amused discomfort clearly rapt with their conversation.

“One need not be a Palentian saint to warn travelers that the bridge is out,” Samantha shot back.

“Still, for you to call my appreciation broad, is not unlike the sunrise calling the sunset orange,” Mercu laughed dryly.

“I dare say I am at least more particular than you, just not in the same petty ways,” Samantha said thwapping her brother lightly on the back of the head with the hand that had been rested on his shoulder.

“Is it petty to have a weakness for a keen mind?” Mercu said incredulously, re-adjusting his hat, “Really I would have thought it the other way round.”

“I know for a fact at least a couple of your lovers have not been the brightest…dear brother,” Samantha shot back with an accusatory glance.

“Each clever, and wise in their own ways, I assure you,” Mercu said defiantly, “though I won’t deny sometimes a pretty face…and other virtues cover a great many follies.”

“So that one you ran off with then, which was it, pretty face, or…other virtues?” Samantha needled.

“All of the above, and a way out from under father’s nose,” Mercu said flatly.

“If you say so, I never saw it,” Samantha said shrugging off the obvious dodge.  “Ah here we go,” she said stopping at the step of a large building at the edge of a town, above which hung a sign that declared in bold red lettering, ‘The Grey Lamb.’  Samantha let go of her brother and marched up the steps without a further word.

Mercu looked to Katrisha and Kiannae, and doubted the wisdom of bringing them along after all.  He realized he should have known his sister better.  It was not completely unacceptable to bring young children into a tavern, but he had always thought less of the rare parents he had seen do so.  “So what do you think of my sister?” he asked the twins, hesitant to follow just yet.

“She’s…” Kiannae seemed to be looking for the word.

“Loud, crazy, uncouth?” Mercu provided questioningly.

“Interesting,” Katrisha offered.  Her sister glanced at her and nodded.

Mercu laughed heartily.  “Perhaps in the ancient proverb sense of the word.”  He sighed.  “Ok, so we are going into this building here.  Talk to noone but me, my sister, and the bartender if need be.  Stay very close, and stay out of anyone’s way.  Ok?”

The girls looked at each other, nodded, and in unison said, “Ok.”

Upon entering the tavern the barkeep gave Mercu one look, and laughed.  “Oh and what ancient god of myth have I angered this day, to find both the Merchant Queen, and the Court Jester in my tavern at once?”

“Court Artist, thank you very much,” Mercu offered in standard retort.

“Indeed,” Samantha laughed, “only the Merchant Queen may so malign her own brother!”

“Oh, how had I not guessed as much,” the barkeep declared dryly.

“Because you are a dim little fellow Olie, though I guess you were bright enough to move down here from up north,” Samantha chuckled.

“Doesn’t take much brains to know a village with no people doesn’t much need a tavern,” Olie chuckled.

“Which explains why you were able to put it together,” Samantha added.

Mercu helped Katrisha and Kiannae up onto two bar stools between Samantha, and himself, and shrugged off the questioning glance from Olie.  “A round of your second best,  for my sister and I,” Mercu declared, “and something…lighter for the little lasses.”

“Only second best dear brother, am I not worth better?” Samantha asked in a hurt tone.

“Only if you enjoy the distinct flavor of cat…piss,” Mercu said, hesitating to say the last word but just embracing the inevitable exposure to excess swearing the girls would get that day.

“And you would know for a fact, that is the exact flavor?” Samantha chuckled.

“It is less of a flavor than a smell.  The tongue refuses to register flavor at all, and simply goes numb on contact,” Mercu laughed defensively.

“So something to drink when forgetting the world is the goal, not for reminiscing about how it used to be?” Samantha asked shaking her head.

“More like something to drink when leaving the world is the goal,” Mercu offered.

“I suppose second best will do then, to early in the day to leave the world!” Samantha declared.

Olie set two large mugs before Mercu and Samantha, and eyed the twins wondering what to give them.  “You two, you are the mage girls from up at the castle aren’t you?” he asked finally realizing he had the subject of many little rumors before him.

“I guess we are,” Katrisha said curiously examining the barkeep with an analytical gaze that made him uncomfortable.

“Don’t believe there are any others,” Kiannae added looking around the bar at the few customers, all seated far apart.

“And what do little mage girls drink?” Olie asked curiously.

“Cider mostly,” Kiannae responded.

“Humph, not the kind I have I’ll wager,” Olie laughed.  “Bah, I’ll figure something out,” he said and wandered off into the back.

“So, tell me of life at the castle girls,” Samantha prodded, and sipped from her mug.

“Why not ask me?” Mercu said feigning injury, “I’ve certainly been there longer.”

“I wanted the truth” Samantha chided, “and barring that, I’ll take the exaggerations of eight year olds, over yours.  They should be at least half as distorted.”

“Very well,” Mercu said and took a drink.

“So, please, do tell me of life at the castle,” Samantha prodded.

“It’s all right,” Kiannae said, “better sometimes than others.”

“Like when there is a ball,” Katrisha added.

“I guess those can be fun, but all the old people can be so dull,” Kiannae said absently looking about.

“We get to stay up later at least,” Katrisha countered.

“As if any force in the cosmos could change how late or early you two go to sleep.”  Mercu laughed.  “A ball just means you might get yelled at less for it.”

“And that’s nice,” Kiannae said, biting her lip playfully.

“I agree, staying up late for a good ball when the old people aren’t being boring is always grand,” Samantha laughed and took another sip, “not getting yelled at for it is even better.”

“Since when do you know much of balls dear sister?” Mercu asked incredulously.  “Getting yelled at on the other hand, I suppose you could speak volumes on that.”

“Oh, more than you would think,” Samantha laughed.  “Even if father never asked me to come along, like he did with you, I usually managed to steal something from the wares, sneak my way in, and have a grand time.  As for the yelling, did you ever wonder what it was about some of those nights?”

“It did seem every party, about half way through I’d see this very cross look on his face,” Mercu said thoughtfully.

“Do you remember in Western Palentine, the summer festival in the grand courtyard?” Samantha asked with an egging tone.

“It was a masquerade ball wasn’t it?” Mercu said eying his sister shrewdly.

“Yup, and you remember when a girl dancing with the young crown prince suddenly bent him,” Samantha stressed, “over, and kissed him.”  She laughed.

“Oh, fates…that was you wasn’t it?” Mercu laughed.  “I knew you were impossible, impetuous, I maybe even suspected you snuck into a few of those balls…but that.  Dear sister I do believe my respect for you just went up tenfold.”

“Would it go up any farther if I told you the prince proposed?” Samantha laughed.

“He what?” Mercu gasped almost spitting his most recent sip.

“Had to let him down of course, his father would never have let him go through with it,” Samantha said wistfully.  “I let him down very gently of course…very very gently,” she chuckled.

“I never thought it possible, but perhaps you are worse than me,” Mercu said shaking his head, “and you know what, I think I remember father muttering something about paying the King to take you off his hands.”

“To father,” Samantha laughed raising her mug towards her brother over the girls heads.

“May he rest comfortably in whatever pleasant home he’s found,” Mercu added, and tapped his mug to Samantha’s, “very, very far from here.”   They both drank.

“So the prince really liked you?” Kiannae asked curiously.

“He inclined me to believe so,” Samantha said taking a small sip.  “When it gets right down to it, royals are real people, even if they often have very big heads.  They are trained to be outsiders, to not be treated like real people, but guess what, deep down, it’s what a lot of them actually want.”

“So you treated him like a real person?” Katrisha asked a bit confused.

“Sort of.  To be fair I think I treated him like a piece of meat, but men don’t often know the difference,” Samantha laughed.

“You treated him like meat?” Kiannae asked her face scrunched up in confusion.

“That doesn’t sound nice,” Katrisha said flatly.  “Why did that make him like you?”

“You know, I suppose I don’t really get it either, but he wasn’t the last to have that reaction,” Samantha said leaning her head on her hand, and taking another sip.

“Boys are funny,” Katrisha said looking at Mercu, and then thinking better of it as he raised an eyebrow.

“Some of us aim for funny,” Mercu said with a laugh.  “It attracts a better kind of attention…well and the worse kind too still, really.”

Olie returned with two mugs similar to the ones Mercu and Samantha were slowly nursing, but containing a distinctly redder liquid.  “There,” he said with a touch of pride in his voice “not a drop of alcohol, and surprisingly not horrid for it either.”

Katrisha pulled the one before her closer, and sniffed at it.  Hesitantly she leaned the heavy mug towards her and took a testing sip.  “Strawberry?” she remarked questioningly.

“Among other things, had to cut the syrup down a bit, added twist of this and that for flavor,” Olie said vaguely. “Not quite as good as some of the things I make for my little one at home, but not bad for what was on hand.”

“You have a little one?” Samantha asked with genuine surprise, and mild interest.

“She’ll be six this fall,” Olie said absently, “darling little thing, ‘bout the same size as these two.”

“We’re eight,” Kiannae corrected.

But before Olie could offer his apology he caught a cold stare from Samantha.

“Funny,” she said in venomous voice, “think the last time I saw you was five years ago.”

“Oh,” Olie said, and cleared his throat, “it’s really not like that.  Girl’s not mine, might as well be though, since I’ve been helping her ma out ever since she was born.  She and I were just friends back then, but I married her two years ago.”

“I see,” Samantha said her eyebrow raised, “well congratulations on both counts then, I guess.”

“Yes, thank you,” Olie said, and quickly extracted himself.

“Story matches what I’ve heard,” Mercu said sipping at his drink, and restraining a laugh.

“Good,” Samantha said tapping her fingers.

“You really do have father’s temper you know,” Mercu laughed.

“And you have mother’s big mouth,” Samantha shot back.

“What’s Samantha mad about?” Kiannae asked Mercu quietly.

“Oh nothing,” Mercu said patting her gently.  “She just thought she’d gotten caught up in a bad situation.  Was a misunderstanding, nothing more.”

“Ok,” Kiannae said not quite understanding.

Two large men had been slowly making their way down from the far end of the bar.  As they arrived the closer of the two bowed, in a slightly wobbly way to Samantha.  “What brings a fine lass such as yourself here today?  I’ve not seen old Mercu bring in a lady before.”

“Well, then today you’ve seen the reverse, a lady brought him in,” Samantha said not even turning to look at the man.

“Now why would such a lovely sight as yourself lessen your own ample contribution to the atmosphere, by bringing along the silly old bard?” the second man asked in a meandering drunken tone.

“You hear that brother, they called you a bard,” Samantha said with a laugh, and took another drink.

“Oh, my condolences,” the second man said with a laugh.  “Explains what you are doing with him.  And makes good sense you are so lovely, given he’s such a pretty boy, you’ve got to compete.”

“You hang out around here much brother?” Samantha said ignoring the two men.  “Locals seem to know you pretty well.”

“I stop by now and then, when I want to hear the more slurred and drunken version of recent events,” Mercu said with a shrug.

“Hey now,” the closer man snapped.  “My friend and I don’t take kindly to being ignored.”

“That’s unfortunate, because I was being kind by tolerating your presence,” Samantha said taking a large swig of her drink.  “I could instead ask you to leave.”

“And if we don’t want to leave?” the closer man laughed.

“Well, that’s the still being nice option, the one that’s left is making you,” Samantha said in a tone that sounded more bored than threatening.

“Now now sister, lets not get hasty,” Mercu said eying her expression shrewdly.  “The village doesn’t take kindly to brawling, and neither does Olie.”

“It isn’t brawling to smack some respect into a weak little woman,” the second man all but yelled, “even less to grind her sissy little brother into the ground.”

“First off,” Samantha said and took the last of her drink in one long gulp.  “I am the little sister.”  Then without warning she swung at the man, and landed her punch square on his nose.  The man staggered backwards, almost knocking over his friend.  “Second, you want a woman asking for it, right here, let’s see if you are as much of a man as you think you are.”

“Oh fates,” Mercu said looking at the twins next to him.  He quickly lifted Kiannae over the bar,  as Olie made haste towards them.

“You stupid bitch,” the first man said with slurred speech as he held his bleeding nose.

“Stop this right now Matly,” Olie yelled picking up a half empty bottle, and brandishing it at the man whose nose was bleeding.

Mercu quickly put Katrisha beside her sister behind the bar, and glared at them firmly.  “Stay down.”

“Me!” the man spat through blood soaked lips.  “She hit me!”

“And I know you both well enough to know who started this trouble,” Olie shot back, “and who’s more likely to back down from a fight.”

“I never backed down from a fight,” Matly spat again.

“That isn’t true, now is it?” Olie said looking at Matly’s startled friend.

“Well, there was that one time,” the man said.

“Cut it Anton,” Matly growled, “I’m not stoppin’ anything till this little shit learns to respect her betters.”

“To the abyss with you then,” Olie said putting down the bottle, “the damages go on your tab.”

“What damages?” Matly asked incredulously as Samantha lunged towards him.  He swung at her approach, but missed as she dropped, and kicked the side of his leg, causing him to stumble sideways, and crash into a table.  The sparse other patrons who had been watching the escalation didn’t quite know what to make of the scene.

One large man stood, and walked towards the dazed Matly, who was rubbing his head where he had hit it on the now broken table.  “What’s the problem brother?” the man almost laughed, “this little girl giving you trouble?”

“Bitch broke my nose,” Matly growled.

“If you let her, you probably deserved it,” the man laughed, “but I suppose I can’t let that stand.”

“You aren’t drunker than your brother,” Samantha said as she watch the way the man approached her, “so I can only assume you are stupider.  So what’s your name pretty boy?”

“Hanson,” the man said sizing up Samantha’s stance carefully.

“You make a habit of getting in your brother’s fights?” Samantha asked looking for an opening.

“Not usually, only when his honor is sullied enough I need to save face for the family,” Hanson said taking a guarded testing swing at Samantha that she easily avoided, then tried for his leg, to no avail.

“Shouldn’t you maybe be trying to beat some sense into him yourself then?” Samantha said throwing her own testing strike, finding it deflected, and barely avoiding the returned blow.

“Don’t think I haven’t tried, boy doesn’t learn,” Hanson said with a shrug.  “Always goes off again and pisses off some worthless woman, then has to deal with her brother, husband, cousin…usually manages it himself though.  First time he’s been drunk enough to let a woman land a blow on him.”

“So you think the only reason I could land a blow on him, was because he was drunk eh?” Samantha asked with a laugh.  Hanson simply shrugged again, but didn’t see the kick to his groin coming.  “Stupid people don’t need to breed,” she said as the man crumpled to the ground.

Anton started to approach Samantha, but found Mercu in his way.  “If you and your friends really think so little of women, wouldn’t it be giving them too much credit to make the fight three on one?”

Anton glared incredulously at Mercu, and gave him a hard shove.  “Out of my way, no one lands a cheap shot on Hanson like that, and gets away with it.”

“Ok, not listening to reason,” Mercu said, and swung, catching Anton in the gut, then another to the face.

Anton rubbed his jaw a bit where the punch had landed.  “You hit like a girl,” he said, just as Matly got to his feet, and charged at Samantha.  She ducked, and rolled the man over her, and into another table.

“Thank you,” Mercu said with a laugh, and dodged as Anton threw a punch at him.

Hanson stumbled to his feet, grabbed a chair, and started to swing it at Samantha, but found himself blinded by a sudden flash of light.  He missed, and lost his grip on the chair which flew into Matly, who crumpled under the blow.  Samantha kicked the staggered Hanson in the stomach, tipping him over, and causing him to hit his head on the floor knocking him out.

Anton, who was distracted by the sight of Hanson and Matly’s defeat missed Mercu sweeping his leg out from under him, and knocked his head hard on the bar.

“I saw that you two,” Mercu said glancing at the girls peeking up from behind the bar.

“Sorry,” Katrisha said hesitantly.

“No, no, very good,” Mercu said as his sister walked over, dusting off her hands.  He turned to her, and with only a hint of humor asked, “As for you, dear sister.  That incident with the tar…it didn’t also involve feathers, did it?”

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Mercu lifted Katrisha and Kiannae into Samantha’s wagon behind her, and pulled himself up as well.  He watched as the girls looked around the cramped interior of the wagon, and Samantha rummaged through various stacks of small wares at the far end.

“So this is where you grew up?” Kiannae asked.

Mercu looked around thoughtfully.  “One of them I think,” Mercu said uncertainly, “it’s hard to be sure if it’s the same wagon after all these years.”

“It is,” Samantha said emerging from her private stockpile with a bottle of wine in one hand, and a bundle of small sticks with various colored crystals at the end in the other.  “Axle broke on the way into the town father retired in.  I considered just replacing the wagon, but I couldn’t get a good price for it, nor a replacement fast enough.”

“It’s very small,” Katrisha said bluntly.

“It is a cramped way to grow up,” Mercu agreed, and then his face saddened, “particularly when mother died, and Samantha started traveling with us.”

“You never told us your mother was dead too,” Katrisha said sadly.

“I don’t think of her much,” Mercu admitted with a bit of shame.  “I only saw her every year or two when we would stop in the town where she, and Samantha lived.  I barely remember her any more.”

“I barely remember mother either,” Kiannae said sadly, “just the way she used to sing.”

“Here you two,” Samantha said offering the twins each one of the sticks she held.  “Palentian honey candy, very sweet, and they swear actually good for you…but never trust anything a merchant tells you about the merits of her wares.”

“Thank you,” each girl said in turn.

“Here, you too brother,” Samantha said offering Mercu one.  “I do know how you love to suck on things.”

“Must you?” Mercu said taking it, and rolling his eyes.

“What?” Samantha said feigning innocence. “I remember whenever you would get your hands on one of these when you were younger, you would sit around all day chewing on the stick while you drew in that book of yours.”  She popped the last of the candies into her mouth, plucked two glasses from a cupboard overhead, and poured wine into each.

Mercu accepted his glass of wine, and took a seat on a bench at the head of the wagon.  “It’s been so many years since I’ve been inside of one of these,” he said wistfully.

“If you miss it, you could have come to visit sooner,” Samantha chided.

“I really don’t,” Mercu laughed as the twins squeezed onto the bench next to him, “oh don’t get me wrong, the road itself, the company, even including you dear sister, but not these cramped overloaded wagons.  That I could do without.”

“Still good to get back to your roots, even the less pleasant parts, at least now and then?” Samantha said in a questioning tone.

“I suppose,” Mercu agreed with some humor.

“Do you have anything for us to drink?” Katrisha asked taking her honey candy out long enough to speak.

“Not much on hand,” Samantha said thoughtfully.  “You can try some of my wine if you like.  Mother let me have a little sip when I was about your age.”

Mercu perked a brow.  “I’m not sure if Laurel would approve, but I guess what’s the harm in a sip.”

Samantha leaned over towards the girls, and offered her glass to Katrisha.  “Be very careful with the glass she said.”  Katrisha took it, sniffed, and scrunched up her nose before trying a sip.  She shook her head in obvious distaste.  In spite of her sister’s reaction Kiannae took the glass from her, and tried it as well.  She put on a brave face for a moment, but inevitably gave way to perfect copy of her sister’s expression.

Samantha took the glass back, and laughed.  “Yeah that was about my reaction at your age as well.”  She looked to her brother, and sighed.  “So I don’t suppose you know of any good healers looking to travel?  Our current one is preparing to return home to the local cloister, she’s tired of traveling with two children in tow I guess.”

“I’m afraid that will probably be your best bet to find one as well,” Mercu said dourly, “unless you want to try and hire away the local Clarion priest, the King might even offer you a small boon for getting him off our hands.”

“The King does not favor the Clarions?” Samantha asked with some surprise.

“The King has tried to remain neutral,” Mercu said flatly.  “I think in spite of better judgement.  He seems to have earned most of the ire he could have from the Clarions, while gaining none of the benefits of keeping Sisters at court.  It’s been years since we have had a resident healer.”

“That does seem an awkward place to be in,” Samantha said and sipped her wine.

“Endlessly.  It’s only gotten worse with the Matron visiting regularly now,” Mercu laughed.  All we have left are preachers, and Idolus.  Miserable man, barely competent.”

“The Matron?” Samantha asked curiously.

“To keep the girls here in touch with their brother.”

“You had mentioned a brother in one of those letters,” Samantha said absently.

“You might meet him if you go looking for a healer at Highvale,” Mercu said with a shrug.  “Where are you headed next any way?”

“North through the pass of course…then north again,” Samantha said feigning indifference, but clearly she wasn’t.

“Much as we need someone to risk the east road,” Mercu said hesitantly, “I’m glad it won’t be you.  Even though there has been no sign of the bandits for well over a year, they were never caught, and they even killed old Hamon.”

“Hamon you say.  Everyone has heard about what happened, but I’d missed that he was involved.  That is troubling, and a damn shame too.  I’ve had an offer to reconsider, since Osyrae is itself not a charming picture,” Samantha said with a frown. “Still you know what father always said, the riskier the road…”

“The more we get our monies worth for the mercenaries we have to hire any way,” Mercu finished with a dark laugh.  “Still, an offer?”

“It was from a baron in South Rook,” Samantha said.  “Strictly it was an offer of payment to make a delivery.  It was clear it was a bribe.  I took a vote any way, and several people I expected to be against it, weren’t.  I don’t think I was the only one offered a lucrative opportunity, but not enough to sway the vote.”

“The road is heavily patrolled now.  There have been no signs, and where the bandits had camped in the northern woods showed signs they were driven off by Sylvans.”  Mercu hesitated. “Not that for the life of me I can think why I am making a case for you to try it.”

“Because someone needs to, and you are vested with the wellbeing of this nation.  Still, that they took down Hamon,” Samantha said coming back to the thought uneasily, and took another sip. “I wish I had another mage, I might consider it, but decent mages are hard to come by this far from Mordove, at least until you get into Osyrae, or one of the free cities.”

“I am a decent mage,” Katrisha offered in an offended tone.

“As am I,” Kiannae chimed in as well.

Samantha laughed, “After today I’d trust the pair of you to do the job.  I’m not sure I’ve seen our current mage do more than a common light orb.  Alas I don’t think Mercu here would spare you.”  The twins each looked a bit deflated, but seemed to accept Samantha’s answer.

⁃ ◇ ❖ ◇ ⁃

Coria 5th, 641 E.R.

Wren sat between the bars of the railing above the main entry to the cloister, kicking his feet idly.  He looked up as three new arrivals entered.  A tall woman with long blond hair was greeted by Andria, and introduced her son and daughter each several years Wren’s elder.

The girl waved to Wren absently as she glanced up in his direction.  Wren waved back, and the girl walked to stand just below him.  “What are you doing up there?” she asked curiously.

“Nothin’,” Wren said absently, “just watchin’.”

“You should come down, and be introduced proper,” the girl said sternly.

“What’re you giving him grief for,” the girl’s brother said walking up beside her, “he’s just a little kid, leave him be.”

“I just wanted to say hello,” the girl said defensively.

“Well you have, let’s get back to mother,” the boy said firmly.

“I’m Audry,” the girl said ignoring her brother’s insistence.

“I’m Wren,” he replied in kind.

“Nice to meet you,” Audry said with a curtsy.

“Come on,” Audry’s brother insisted.

“Alright, Andrew,” she said dismissively.

“Have you been placed yet?” Audry asked, “Mother says now that we aren’t on the road we will be placed for teaching.”

“No,” Wren said absently, “my mother has been teaching me.”

“Oh,” Audry said, “guess that makes sense.  We are older.  Mother has been teaching us till now.”

“Others have been placed,” Wren said with a shrug.

“Audry,” the tall woman called waving her daughter over.

“Gotta go,” Audry said as she turned to leave, “guess I’ll see you around.”

“Watching the new arrivals?” Renae asked as she stepped behind Wren.

“Where are they from?” Wren asked, as he watched a woman with short brown hair walk in and look around searchingly.

Renae considered the group, and recognized the woman talking with Andria.  “Shandra, their mother, grew up here many years ago, but wanted to see the world,” Renae said rubbing Wren’s head.  “So like I once did, she signed up with merchant caravans.  The good ones never travel without a healer.  Most prefer us to the Clarions, more service, less preaching.”

“Who’s that one?” Wren asked curiously.

“A merchant prince’s assistant I expect,” Renae offered with only moderate interest.  “No doubt looking for some young Brother or Sister with the wander lust.  Usually they come themselves, but sometimes send a proxy to save time.”

“Hello there, who’s your caravan master?” Renae yelled down at the woman, who looked up at her a bit coldly.

“Yer talkin’ to her,” Samantha shot back. “I’d expect better of the Sisterhood than to make such assumptions.”

“Your pardon then,” Renae said with good humor.  “I expect less of the world to be fair.  Only once before met a woman in command of a caravan.”

“Apology accepted,” Samantha laughed, “it’s just fun to catch people in their reasonable preconceptions.”

“Your name then, if you would, oh grand caravan master,” Renae enquired leaning on the rail above Wren.

“Samantha Peregrine,” she said simply.

“Peregrine, surely it can’t be,” Renae said perking a brow, “are you any relation to a Mercu Peregrine who lives at court on Broken Hill?”

“My dear brother, who I had not seen in many years till just a few days ago.” Samantha laughed. “Why am I not surprised to find he is recognized by name in a Lycian Cloister?”

“I am not sure if I should take that comment kindly,” Renae said a bit tersely.

“I surely am not one to be making any judgements,” Samantha said more seriously, “just curious observations, and likely connections.”

“Yes there is no doubt you are his kin,” Renae said with a laugh, “but you’ve been caught in your own preconceptions.   I am quite familiar with good Mercu, but for reasons of a shared interest.  Have you met the twins?”

“Yes,” Samantha said with a smile, “darling clever little things they are.”

“And you are aware there is a brother then?” Renae continued.

“Ah, so then, the Matron Renae,” Samantha said assuming a shrewd expression, “and I shall risk being wrong again, and guess that the little one below you is the young Wren?”

“You would be right,” Wren said curiously.

“He speaks well,” Samantha remarked with some surprise, “a credit to his line, or perhaps to you?”

“I wish I could take more credit,” Renae said guardedly, “though I suppose I have a hand in it.”

“So tell me, good Matron,” Samantha began again, changing her posture slightly, “do you know of any you can spare, who might wish to see the world?”

Renae pursed her lips.  “There is one I can think of, who I’d like to think could be convinced.”  She was at least hopeful that it was the case.

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